Dr. Lodge is the Chief Science and Innovation Officer at Cellero. She has a strong background in cell-based therapeutics and immunology, including a Ph.D. in Cell and Molecular Biology from the University of Vermont and a postdoctoral fellowship with the Multiple Sclerosis Society studying the role of T cells in the disease process. Learn more about Dr. Lodge.

Ask A Scientist: What’s the Difference Between Primary and Immortalized Cells?

While most researchers today prefer primary cells for immunology, inflammation, and vaccination experiments due to the close match to in vivo function, immortalized cell lines still have advantages and preferred use cases. Let’s take a closer look at the differences between the two cell types. Understanding the Difference Primary cells are isolated directly from a…

Anti-SIRPα Antibodies: A Promising Avenue for Immunotherapy

Conventional cancer therapies such as chemotherapy and radiation have a significant downfall: while targeting cancerous tumors, they also damage healthy cells which can lead to undesirable patient side-effects. Despite high expectations at the onset, treatments using monoclonal antibodies have historically faced limitations. While attempting to discover why monoclonal antibodies were not performing as expected, researchers…

Thank You for a Great 2017!

It’s hard to believe 2017 is coming to a close in just a few short days. What a year it has been! There have been many groundbreaking immunotherapy innovations this year. From the first-ever FDA-approved CAR-T cell therapy to the federal PACT initiative investing $215 million in immunotherapy research to countless other advancements, it’s incredible…

Ask A Scientist: Is There an Alternative Measure of Autoimmune Disease Activity?

Many autoimmune diseases are characterized by the presence of antibodies to normal proteins. For example, in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), it’s typical to see antibodies to citrullinated peptides. In Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), antibodies to double-stranded DNA and other nuclear proteins are hallmarks of the disease. Physicians use these different antibody reactivity patterns to distinguish autoimmune…